No-Code
August 4, 2022
Matilda Morris-Jones
No-Code

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Tens of thousands of people all over the world share their experiences of no-code, ask questions of their peers and offer advice on how to improve their builds and turn a hobby into a career.

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Tens of thousands of people all over the world share their experiences of no-code, ask questions of their peers and offer advice on how to improve their builds and turn a hobby into a career.

Tens of thousands of people all over the world share their experiences of no-code, ask questions of their peers and offer advice on how to improve their builds and turn a hobby into a career.

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Physical communities allow us to connect with others and provide a sense of security and well being. Online communities offer similar benefits and, if linked to a shared purpose, allow us to share experience and learn from others.

 

As no-code programming has developed in recent years, so has the no-code community. Tens of thousands of people all over the world share their experiences of no-code, ask questions of their peers and offer advice on how to improve their builds and turn a hobby into a career.

 

According to Jacob Arnould, the CEO of Skippet, the image of a traditional developer is of an independent contributor connected to their computer but not much else. “But this no-code community is really collaborative and they're feeding each other and bringing in new people and expanding the community,” he said.

 

Some of the best resources for those looking to learn more about no-code are:

On the Reddit no-code community, posters describe how they built a customer relationship management tool without coding or an inventory management app in just 90 minutes. They link to videos to allow others to learn from their experience. People new to no-code ask questions and one poster asks for help to build a drinking game app.

 

Nocodefounders.com describes itself as a “global community of founders and businesses using no-code tools to grow faster” and boasts more than 13,000 members.

 

Jacob notes that members of the no-code community have a sense of feeling like superheroes with superpowers when they discover they can make their own apps and automations.

 

“No-code can be a hobby or people can then use it to improve their personal life or their work. I love the sense of people feeling excited, being creative and choosing to do it not because their boss demands it of them,” he said.

 

“It's a big community and people are always sharing a couple of blocks of automation that just instantly makes something really helpful like converting a file type from a PNG to a JPEG. All they do is click a button and it does it. Or creating an automation like sending a text message to someone as soon as they arrive at the office.”

 

Skippet will launch its app later this year and it will make no-code app development even easier by using natural language to create apps.

 

“Solving a problem or implementing a solution should be as easy as describing it. Someone may struggle to figure out a solution to a problem but if they can describe their problem, Skippet will solve it for them,” said Jacob, Skippet’s CEO.

 

Follow Skippet on Twitter and join the waitlist to get access when it launches.